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64 Weiherweg
Basel, BS, 4054
Switzerland

78-744-69-28

As a regional network of Biomimicry 3.8, Biomimicry Switzerland empowers Swiss educators, businesses and policymakers to sustainably emulate nature's 3.8 billion years of design strategies for human innovation and problem solving.

This process of consulting life’s genius utilises a clear, proven design methodology and effective implementation tools, developed by Biomimicry 3.8 over more than a decade of work with a broad range of stakeholders.  

As a regional network of Biomimicry 3.8, our mission is to empower Switzerland to sustainably emulate nature’s 3.8 billion years of elegant design strategies.  We work with policymakers, business, investors, educators, engineers, architects, designers, and other innovators to translate nature’s genius for the design of products, processes and systems that create conditions conducive to life.

Biomimicry Switzerland is dedicated to reconnecting people with nature, and human systems with natural systems.  Our vision is a high-tech economy that is also an extension of ecology, where human and natural system designs flow seamlessly together. 

Our team offers education and consulting on how natural systems can provide insights into solving systematic sustainability challenges through the emergence of new business models and financial instruments.  We perform economic and financial research, in-depth market analysis, and strategic consulting to entrepreneurs, investors, scientists and policy leaders to help accelerate the commercialisation of biomimetic innovations.  We also develop collaborative partnerships and services to support interdisciplinary exchange and dialogue across industry sectors and regional borders.

Keywords:

Nature, ecology, connections, biomimicry, biomimetic, bionics, innovation, commercialization, finance, impact investments, design, sustainability, education, entrepreneurs, innovators, network, crowd funding, collaboration, expertise, science, biology, engineering, clean technology, analysis, financial analysis, biomimics, workshops, design challenge, teaching, financial instruments, rating systems, financial architecture, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, material science, scientific expertise, consulting, client relationships, creativity

 

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Biomimicry Thinking

Biomimicry (from bios, meaning life, and mimesis, meaning to imitate) is a design discipline that seeks sustainable solutions by emulating nature’s time-tested patterns and strategies, e.g., a solar cell inspired by a leaf. The core idea is that Nature, imaginative by necessity, has already solved many of the problems we are grappling with: energy, food production, climate control, non-toxic chemistry, transportation, packaging, and a whole lot more.

Animals, plants, and microbes are the consummate engineers. They have found what works, what is appropriate, and most importantly, what lasts here on Earth. Instead of harvesting organisms, or domesticating them to accomplish a function for us, biomimicry differs from other "bio-approaches" by consulting organisms and ecosystems and applying the underlying design principles to our innovations. This approach introduces an entirely new realm for entrepreneurship that can contribute not only innovative designs and solutions to our problems but also to awakening people to the importance of conserving the biodiversity on Earth that has so much yet to teach us.  (Source: Biomimicry 3.8)

Biomimicry, the practice of looking deeply into nature for solutions to engineering, design and other challenges, has inspired a film about it's ground-breaking vision for creating a long-term, sustainable world. This film covers how mimicking nature solves some of our most pressing problems, from reducing carbon emissions to saving water.
Life creates conditions conducive to life
— Janine Benyus
Harvesting Desert Fog The Namibian Beetle raises its back into the air as fog rolls into its desert habitat. Bumps on its shell catch water droplets, which then run down chutes toward its mouth. “The design of this fog-collecting structure can be reproduced cheaply on a commercial scale and may find application in water-trapping tent and building coverings,” wrote the authors of a 2001 paper that revealed how the water collection works. Inventors and designers have taken note. A “Dew Bank Bottle,” designed by Pak Kitae of the Seoul National University of Technology, imitates the beetle’s water-collection system. Morning dew condenses on it and conveys it to a bottle, which has a drinking spout. (Source: Bloomberg) Photographs by Michael & Patricia Fogden/Minden Pictures; Courtesy Pak Kitae

Harvesting Desert Fog

The Namibian Beetle raises its back into the air as fog rolls into its desert habitat. Bumps on its shell catch water droplets, which then run down chutes toward its mouth. “The design of this fog-collecting structure can be reproduced cheaply on a commercial scale and may find application in water-trapping tent and building coverings,” wrote the authors of a 2001 paper that revealed how the water collection works.

Inventors and designers have taken note. A “Dew Bank Bottle,” designed by Pak Kitae of the Seoul National University of Technology, imitates the beetle’s water-collection system. Morning dew condenses on it and conveys it to a bottle, which has a drinking spout.

(Source: Bloomberg)

Photographs by Michael & Patricia Fogden/Minden Pictures; Courtesy Pak Kitae